cotch dot netweblogphotobloggallerieslatestprints

login | search:

[About me] About the author
[Me]

Touring Britain bit by bit with a pair of boots, a few bicycles, a lot of trains and a bag of lenses. I take pictures and then I write about them.

RSS feeds Subscribe

Subscribe to the weblog:

RSS 2.0 Add to Google

or get updates on social networks:

more RSS feeds

Photoblog Photoblog

footprints

footprints

Archive - RSS

abandoned places and things architecture bristol coastal cumbria dorset events highlands history industrial lake district lakes london mountains not the uk photo essays photography politics protests rural science scotland somerset structures the north uk urban urban decay wales westcountry all tags


Page: 1

Sat, 1 Mar 2014

Lots Road Power Station

Battersea Sunset

Over the years, living and commuting in a variety of places, there have been objects and views that I've had the chance to shoot again and again, in all different lights and seasons. The current object, between my flat in Battersea and office in South Kensington, is Lots Road Power Station, allegedly known as the "Chelsea monster", across the Thames at the western end of Chelsea.

Lots Road

Lots Road Power Station

Battersea Riverside

Battersea swans

Geese

Lots Road Power Station

Battersea Reach

Lots Road Power Station

Lots Road Power Station

Built in 1904 to power the new Brompton and Picadilly Circus Railway the Picadilly Line tube the coal-fired power station was converted to gas in the 1970s, losing two of its four chimneys. With air pollution regulations pushing power generation out of the city, the station finally closed in 2002, and is currently under renovation and redevelopment as shops and flats.

Lots Road Power Station


[Tag] Tags: architecture, chelsea, industrial, london, lots road power station, the same photo again, uk, urban, west london


Sun, 13 Jan 2013

On the canals at Castlefield

TPE 185

Until May 2011, when I had to go to a meeting in the city, I'd never been to Manchester. I've still spent barely any time there.

Castlefield

narrowboat

With little time to devote to photography while there, I instinctively rode over to the part of the city centre that looked most interesting on the Ordnance Survey map: Castlefield.

Bridgewater Canal

With the world's first industrial canal and the world's first passenger railway, the neighbourhood is a tangle of basins and viaducts and narrow cobbled pathways. The Bridgewater Canal arrived here from the Worsley coal field in 1761, and a second branch of the canal reached the Mersey estuary at Runcorn three years later. The opening of the Rochdale Canal through to West Yorkshire in 1804 put Castlefield on a through-route, and the basin was also connected to the nearby River Irwell later to be turned into the Manchester Ship Canal.

goose family!

viaducts

In 1830 the canals were joined by the railways, with the world's first passenger line, the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, terminating at Liverpool Road Station (now the Museum of Science and Industry) adjacent to but not crossing the basins. The first two railway viaducts over the water came in 1849 with the Manchester South Junction & Altrincham Railway lines which fork here as they head west from Piccadilly. These lines were in turn crossed by even higher viaducts with 1877's Cheshire Lines into Manchester Central victims of the Beeching Axe, but reused in the early 1990s for the trams and the now disused turreted tubular steel Great Northern Railway viaduct of 1894.

new on old

Now it's in the half-done regeneration stage, with mixed decayed and preserved industry, warehouse conversions, empty plots and infill apartment blocks.

Castlefield

Castlefield

Castlefield

Castlefield

Bridgewater Canal

Castlefield

Castlefield

Duckling in danger

Castlefield

Castlefield

Castlefield

Castlefield

Castlefield

Castlefield

Castlefield

I think the instincts probably did a reasonable job.

Museum of Science and Industry


[Tag] Tags: canals, history, industrial, manchester, railways, the north, uk, urban decay, urban


Sun, 30 Sep 2012

At Abereiddy

Abereiddy

Walking south along the coast path of St David's Head in the Pembrokeshire National Park, amongst the bays and headlands of rugged and ragged cliffs and worn-down volcanic hills, one lesser, lower, headland stands out for its clearly man-made feature.

Abereiddy

The squat little tower of Abereiddy, standing on a headland that is barely still there, more hole than headland, where the Blue Lagoon has been carved out as part of the long lost local slate mining industry.

Abereiddy

Standing sentinel over the little bay and beach, and the little street of houses behind.

More photos in the Pembrokeshire gallery

View Larger Map Ordnance Survey Map


[Tag] Tags: coastal, industrial, pembrokeshire, quarries, rural, uk, wales


Sun, 15 Jul 2012

The Crinan Canal

Loch Fyne

Not your usual inland navigation: the 14km canal from sea to sea Ardrishaig on Loch Gilp in the east and Crinan on the Sound of Jura in the west, cutting across the top of the long and narrow Kintyre-Knapdale peninsula built in 1794 for commercial sea going sailing vessels.

Crinan Canal

Crinan Canal

Later replaced by steamboats, the Clyde Puffers, cargo carriers between Glasgow and the Hebridean islands and isolated West Highland coastal communities.

boats!

And now in turn largely replaced by private yachts, taking advantage of the 100km shortcut and bypass of the exposed waters around the Kintyre peninsula that are provided by the canal.

Crinan Canal

Crinan Canal

Crinan Canal

Crinan Canal

Crinan Canal

Crinan

And by towpath tourists taking in the views to the islands and out over the Moine Mhòr to the mountains.

coos

View Larger Map


[Tag] Tags: canals, highlands, history, industrial, rural, scotland, uk


Sun, 20 May 2012

On Snowdon

Snowdon

Some shots from Britain's busiest mountain, and the highest in Wales, mostly from an ascent in June 2009.

sheep!

Snowdon

It's not just that Snowdon is busy with tourists hiking on the several ascent paths. Far more visibly than many of Britain's highlands, it's a very developed and exploited landscape — and not just in terms of the mountain having a railway all the way to the top, where you can take in the view from inside a coffee shop.

Snowdon

The mountainsides around here are strewn with the ruins and remains of industrial workings: quarries and mines, and the railways that took the region's rocks away.

Snowdon

Snowdon

If indeed the mountainsides even still exist: across the Llanberis Pass, the view of Snowdon's neighbour Elidir Fawr is dominated by the 700 acre Dinorwic quarry, closed since 1969 but still an open wound.

Snowdon

Not necessarily a bad thing. From this distance in time, much of the industry and development adds interest to the landscape. And I don't suppose Welsh would have wanted to preserve their Highlands if the only method on offer was that by which the Scottish Highlands escaped development.

Snowdon

Quarry buildings

Snowdon

Snowdon

Snowdon

Llyn Padarn and the Snowdon massif

Llanberis Pass

Snowdon

stone


View LargerOrdanance Survey Map


[Tag] Tags: industrial, mountains, railways, rural, snowdon, snowdonia, uk, wales


Sat, 11 Feb 2012

Cwmorthin

The Barracks

Cwmorthin is one of the many huge disused slate quarries and mines around Blaenau Ffestiniog in Snowdonia, a mile walk up into the Moelwyn Mountains from the town and station.

Cwmorthin

Cwmorthin

Most of the workings are underground, in the many miles of mine tunnels that climb and descend inside the mountain, some of them still open to cavers, others now damaged by the attempts to use explosives to aid the extraction of slate in the quarry's final working years in the 1990s.

Quarry

But there's still lots to see above ground, around the portals beside the lake, Llyn Cwmorthin.

Cwmorthin

Cwmorthin

In addition to the huge spoil heaps, which send tentacles reaching out into the lake, the quarrymaster's house is intact, but boarded up and getting scruffy. But the quarrymen's barracks, whose residents had a life expectancy of 44 years, have been in ruins for several decades.

Cwmorthin

These photos were all taken early one May morning. There's a lot more industrial archaeology in the Cwmorthin valley that I didn't get to see that time I must go back.

View Larger Map Ordnance Survey Map


[Tag] Tags: abandoned places and things, blaenau ffestiniog, cwmorthin, history, industrial archaeology, industrial, moelwyn mountains, mountains, north wales, quarries, ruins, rural decay, rural, snowdonia, uk, wales


Wed, 8 Feb 2012

Burst of bicycle couples

A short set of photos I took in the autumn on Zeeburgereiland, one of the artificial islands off Amsterdam's waterfront. Surrounded by all sorts of bridges and tunnels, shipping canals and dams, motorways and tramways, but with these three silos standing alone in a big empty wasteland...

bicycle path

bicycle path

bicycle path

I have added the Netherlands to the site's collection of galleries.


[Tag] Tags: cycling, industrial, netherlands, not the uk, urban decay


Sun, 25 Apr 2010

Neighbourhood II

...continued from last week.

Or else stay on the south bank, follow the river around through North Greenwich, and enter the realm of the last remaining real industry, even as it falls to the rolling redevelopment.

Demolition

And you're forced away from the river onto the Blackwall Tunnel road where cars rush through the windswept wastes to better places to be.

Footbridge That.

Through the crushed remains of the peninsula's past, piled on the flattened plots that surround the Millennium Dome, not yet all concreted over for extra ever empty unused parking spaces.

sand

Overlooked by the brave new world of east London.

docklands

As the ferry boats that almost emptied at Greenwich keep sailing back and forth, past A Slice of Reality.

And the high tides keep bringing in the dredgers loaded with the sands of the estuary, the cargo ships of unrefined sugar, the emptied refuse barges returning to their riverside boroughs.

Silvertown + North Greenwich

And the river just keeps flowing.

barrier

Until somebody tells it to stop.


[Tag] Tags: east london, greenwich, industrial, london, river thames, uk, urban decay, urban


Page: 1

Browse...
My other blog is a...
  • Science blog! A blog about cancer cell and molecular biology, coming soon...
  • Skepticism blog! I contribute to the group blog Lay Science on the nature of science, skepticism, and bad arguments.
  • Science publishing blog! It's called Journalology and it's a group blog about publishers, journals, papers and data.
  • Fiction blog! Where I make stuff up, coming soon...
  • Cycling and transport policy blog! I run the group blog At War With The Motorist, where we look at evidence-based urban planning and transport policy, and ride bikes.

Follow them all here.

Find me here...

Creative Commons License All text and photography on this site is Joe Dunckley 2001-10, except where stated otherwise. Text and photos are released under the terms of the Creative Commons BY-NC-SA license, meaning that you may reuse, remix, and republish the work for non-commercial purposes, on the condition that a credit is given to "Joe Dunckley/Cotch.net" and you make it clear that the work is released under this license. See this page for more detailed conditions. Contact me to enquire about commercial and editorial use.