Tag Archives : history


On the canals at Castlefield

Until May 2011, when I had to go to a meeting in the city, I’d never been to Manchester. I’ve still spent barely any time there. With little time to devote to photography while there, I instinctively rode over to the part of the city centre that looked most interesting on the Ordnance Survey map: […]

der Telespargel

Fernsehturm, the television tower in Alexanderplatz, central Berlin, Germany’s tallest structure. Built as a show of GDR strength and to be an icon of East Berlin, but also an excellent example of the pettiness of political rhetoric, positioned deliberately to loom over West Berlin’s Reichstag when the latter is viewed from the front, and in […]

The standing stones of Machrie Moor

On the west side of Arran — the “Scotland in miniature” island of the Firth of Clyde — you might find a gateway, half hidden in high hedges, with a sign indicating the path to Machrie Moor. The track winds through the sheep fields and scrubland, and past a small and slightly mediocre fenced-off stone […]

The Crinan Canal

Not your usual inland navigation: the 14km canal from sea to sea — Ardrishaig on Loch Gilp in the east and Crinan on the Sound of Jura in the west, cutting across the top of the long and narrow Kintyre-Knapdale peninsula — built in 1794 for commercial sea going sailing vessels. Later replaced by steamboats, […]

In Credit Crunch Caernarfon

Caernarfon has been a town of political and economic importance. Positioned on the fertile and mineral rich territory at a small natural harbour at the mouth of the Afon Seiont north of Snowdonia, standing guard over the Menai Strait opposite the Isle of Anglesey, the Celts settled here, later to be ruled over by the […]

The Derwent Dams

At the northern end of Derbyshire the rain that falls on the Dark Peak of the Peak District gathers into the River Derwent, a tributary of the Trent, which cuts a deep valley through the millstone grit plateau. The valley here is dammed by the Howden and Derwent Dams, and then, after conflux of the […]

A82

The A82 between Tyndrum and North Ballachulish in the West Highlands is a remarkable road. Astonishing not just for the breathtaking moorland and mountain landscape that it floats across and weaves through. And the extraordinarily difficult remote and hostile conditions in which it was constructed, across deep peat bogs, around peaks and lochans and over […]

Courthill House

Heading up the coast of the Northwest Highlands, on the road from Kyle of Lochalsh to Applecross and Torridon, a brief glimpse of the mountains of Skye down the length of Loch Kishorn is soon hidden behind the trees and a high wall of big stone blocks. Chimneys poke their stacks out above the wall […]

Edinburgh Castle

I don’t go inside tourist attractions of the historic house and castle variety all that often. The occasional objects of interest on display aren’t usually worth the effort of wading through the endless antique chair arrangements and the endless lists of lords who have sat in the antique chairs. Edinburgh Castle has a little of […]

Cwmorthin

Cwmorthin is one of the many huge disused slate quarries and mines around Blaenau Ffestiniog in Snowdonia, a mile walk up into the Moelwyn Mountains from the town and station. Most of the workings are underground, in the many miles of mine tunnels that climb and descend inside the mountain, some of them still open […]